Tag Archives: travel

Laundry Day

A woman deep in thought while doing laundry in Porto, Portugal. I stare at this image while my own load of laundry finishes whirring in the machine, ready to hang up and dry.

Laundry day… same but different.

Laundry day in Porto, Portugal. Image by Joyce Meyer.

The Return…

I grew up watching the Vietnam Conflict on the nightly news complete with American and VC body counts. Depressing, to say the least. Covid-19, canceled travel plans and the current status of politics has taken its toll on this blog these past few months. I think its about time to get out of this funk… Bring back the music, bring back the excitement of things we love and let’s just get along. For me, faith, music and travel help heal the soul.

You may also feel a little better if you click on the image below for a YouTube video of the song “Get Together” including images from times gone by. May we learn from history rather than forget.

“Get Together,”also known as “Let’s Get Together,” is a song written in the mid-1960s by American singer-songwriter Chet Powers (stage name Dino Valenti). The song is an appeal for peace and brotherhood, presenting the polarity of love versus fear, and the choice to be made between them.

A throwback image with our Italian friends. We treasure time spent with them and others around the world that we have met along the way. Peace out…

Bucket List Destination: COPPER CANYON, Mexico

In the northwestern state of Chihuahua, Copper Canyon is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The combined length of the ravines makes Mexico’s Copper Canyon a whopping four times larger than the Grand Canyon in the United States. In some places, it’s even deeper than the Grand Canyon, with a depth of over 1 mile (1.6 km) The Tarahumara people, or Rarámuri as they’re known in their own language, call the Copper Canyon home. They are a group of indigenous people who have protected their culture and way of life by retreating deep within the Copper Canyon system some 400 years ago when the Spanish arrived in the north. They are so remote and so secretive that there are no accurate estimates as to their population size. The El Chepe Train transports people into the canyon on a railway track that stretches from the city of Chihuahua to Los Mochis on the Pacific coast and consists of 37 bridges and 86 tunnels. ~visitcoppercanyon.com

A visit to Copper Canyon, Mexico, via the El Chepe Train has been on my sister’s Bucket List for 35 years. It’s about time… Below are four videos that document our adventures as we cross the border into Mexico to tackle the Mission NOT Impossible…Copper Canyon, Mexico.

Holiday Card Fail… or is it?

We have FAILED at corresponding with family and friends this year since no holiday cards were sent. We even attempted a photo during our family Christmas gathering! Instead, we have resorted to using social media and this site to feature our greetings and wish our family and friends peace, love and happiness.

Have we really failed? Not in my mind. The money that would have been spent on cards and postage has been donated to the Mefi-Boset Orphanage in Mexicali, Baja, Mexico.

For some time now, I’ve been following, with great interest, the hiking and humanitarian adventures of an amazing, kind hearted nurse originally from our part of the globe along the Minnesota/South Dakota border. From time to time, items are purchased and delivered to the Mefi-Boset Orphanage by this individual living across the border in the United States. The images of these endeavors have spoken to my heart, especially after our visit to small villages and cities along the Copper Canyon region and northern Mexico. I am confident that our donation will provide some much needed items at the Mefi-Boset Orphanage.

It appears as though the Mefi-Boset kids are excited with the new arrivals.
Birthdays are wonderful when you can share with friends.
The person in the white t-shirt is Peggy, my contact for Mefi-Boset Orphanage donations.
Healthy food choices for the orphanage.
Children everywhere across the globe enjoy an ice cream treat.

Thank you, Peggy, for sharing these images of your visit and for all of your humanitarian efforts. “The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.” 
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

Por Favor…?

Divisadero, Mexico | Canon G5X | Topaz Edit

Best salesman ever. Who can resist those sad eyes and timid voice pleading, Compraras, por favor? He nailed it.

2019 Gary Rodeo

Tucked away along the northwest side of the small community of Gary, SD (pop. 224) you will find a natural setting that is perfect for hosting the Gary Rodeo.

Just for giggles and kicks, I’ve put together a short compilation of still shots along with a few video clips. Stills were shot with a Canon Mark 3 with a 70-200 lens. Video clips were taken with an older Panasonic Lumix with a 25-400 zoom.

I must say I was underwhelmed with the quality of the Panasonic video footage. I have a lot to learn when it comes to video, especially when capturing action. I am aware of keeping the shutter at double the fps which would put the shutter around 100, but it just seems so counterintuitive as a still photographer. After fiddling with the settings we decided to just leave it at auto and take what we get. It didn’t help that my husband was using his cataract eye so everything looked fuzzy to him. Oh, well. That will improve next week.

Oh, Paris… What a loss.

My daughter calls with urgency in her voice,“Notre Dame Cathedral is on fire!” I quickly turn the TV on to see the tragic flames as the spire goes down. Immediately, I feel grateful that our trip to hike the Camino de Santiago in northern Spain involved a flight to and from Paris, France. Having a couple of days extra before flying home we decided to hit some of the sights of Paris which included one of the most famous buildings in the world, Notre Dame Cathedral.

The building of the cathedral was completed over the course of 200 years; it was started in 1163 during the reign of King Louis VII and was completed in 1345.

In its history, Notre Dame has endured destruction and subsequent restoration in many periods. However, much of the facade and interior still are true to the original designs. In the 16th century, both the Huguenots and the French king vandalized and changed a lot of the cathedral’s contents. A lot of the features on the cathedral’s exterior were removed because they were considered to be idolatrous, and tombs and stained glass windows were destroyed in the name of modernization. The cathedral was converted into a storage warehouse for food, during the French Revolution, and the heads of many of Notre Dame’s statues were removed.

The Cathedral was at one time in a stage of total disrepair and close to the point of being demolished, but was later saved by Napoleon who himself was crowned Emperor in 1804 inside the Cathedral.

Between 1845 and 1870, a first attempt at restoration took place. A good portion of the previous century’s damage done to the cathedral was repaired, and new additions were built. Most recently, a new restoration program was started in 1991 and has gone on for 20 years with a focus on cleaning up facade’s and sculptures. ~notredamecathedralparis.com

Today’s event has caused quite a step backwards, I’d say…

Below are some of the images I was able to capture during our visit in 2014:

This Notre Dame beggar (Gypsy?) working the line will need to find a new location. Maybe, she’ll try her luck at Sacre Coeur.

One last look…


  • Hike Caminho Portuguese ~ check
  • Stay at Casa Fernanda ~ check
  • Douro Valley ~ check
  • Porto, Portugal ~ check
  • Port wine tasting ~ check
  • Eat sardines and bacalao ~ check
  • Experience albergue life ~ check
  • Meet wonderful people ~ check
  • Eat a Francesinha sandwich ~ check
  • Not get fined on the metro line ~ check
  • Arrive home safely ~ check

Another notch in our belts.

Portugal: Bonus Round #4

Artists and poets still find life’s meaning in a glass of wine. ~Joy Sterling

It is known that grapes were already cultivated in the Douro region around four thousand years B.C. and with the arrival of the Romans in the first century A.D., agriculture became a major activity of the region. While the politics of the region may change throughout history, grapes and wine production remain to be a pretty big deal. I’ll drink to that!

-Douro Valley

Douro Valley view from Casa da BelaVista

Caminho Portuguese: Bonus Round #3

Any Portuguese town looks like a bride’s finery – something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue.  – Mary McCarthy

August 23-24, 2019

Using old school maps we walk along the metro line in Matosinhos until we need to go away from it to find our hostel for the next two nights. (Actually, Randy and Joan read maps and I just follow.) We manage to wind around neighborhoods, a large hospital, and cross crazy traffic until Randy spies a tiny sign in front of the building – Oportocean Hostel.

A metro line stop is practically in our back yard, so off we go to the old section of Porto, to take advantage of a free Porto Walking Tour advertised. Look for the orange umbrella for a tour in English. The tour guide is fabulous, taking us all around the old city centre, along the Douro River, while pointing out interesting landmarks and sharing a tremendous amount of history for two full hours. This young lady will do very well in life and we make sure to tip her accordingly.

Shame on people that ditch a tour when it is almost over to avoid tipping. Rant over.